New Article: “Race, Republicans, and Real Estate: The 1991 Fulton County Tax Revolt”

I’m happy to share the news that this article has just been accepted for publication in the Journal of Urban History.

Here’s the abstract:

A 1991 reappraisal of property in Atlanta and Fulton County, Georgia corrected systemic inequalities in property taxation that had subsidized affluent whites during a boom period. Many of those homeowners responded to reassessment by initiating a major tax revolt. The tax revolt failed to stop reassessment, but won lasting victory in the political arena. Tax revolt politicians successfully linked the economic grievances of taxpayers to resentments against black political leaders and the poor, replaced older, moderate suburban politics with confrontation, and sped partisan realignment and Republican ascendancy in the state. Historical perspective on the politics of the Fulton County tax revolt supports the conclusion that metropolitics were essential to the development of “color-blind” or “laissez-faire” forms of racial ideology that became dominant mode of American racial discourse in the post-civil rights era.

You can link to a .pdf of the submitted version here.

MConnorRaceRepublicansRealEstateJUH7-9-15

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4 comments on “New Article: “Race, Republicans, and Real Estate: The 1991 Fulton County Tax Revolt”

  1. […] was that the property of many of these suburbanites had been grossly undertaxed for years. As I wrote in the Journal of Urban History, drawing on contemporary public sector economists’ analysis […]

  2. […] it doesn’t jibe with some of my scholarship which, building on the important work of many others (Kevin Kruse, Matt Lassiter, George Lipsitz, […]

  3. […] voters exercised influence were profligate wasters of tax money gathered by soaking homeowners underlay major tax revolts in the 1990s, and the formation of new suburban cities in the 2000s and beyond. And it continues […]

  4. […] found this thread running through the words and deeds of anti-tax politicians, advocates for incorporating new cities, and secession advocates in north Fulton County, and it […]

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